Contemporary loft and interior design by Romolo Stanco

This was sent to us from the Romolo Stanco office.

It is Romolo’s own 120 m2 apartment which he designed on the top floor of the Hi-Fi house in Piacenza, Italy in March 2008.

Below a short synopsis of his project.

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

You enter the house and are immediately in an open space that seeks a balance between the linearity imposed by the long, parallel main walls – insisted on one side by the straight flight of stairs, and on the other side by the long structural seat – and the anti-perspective (that is, closed on the visitor’s side and more open further off) diagonal which the new functional volumes are arranged along. The exclusive employ of the white color highlights the shadows, the distances and the independent elements (kitchen, hood, fluepipe…). In a sort of monochrome dripping, the presence of a few sculpt-like elements is dazzling. The big, informal Flap sofa (Edra) in Magenta Lycra, and the pink fridge are a few, essential traits; they stand out as strongly expressive elements – both chromatic and formal.

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

The loft area, which can only be reached by climbing the suspended dinosaur-back like stairs, is the relax-night zone. It is only separated from the living room by a glass that has the same function of theatrical wings. The essential, low bed is opposed to the expressive bathtub (“La vasca” by Matteo Thun).

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

The new volumes are the monolith kitchen block, the fluepipe (which crosses the functional seat at a right angle) and the triangular volume of the bathroom (see below.) The strongly dynamic approach to the project is made even stronger by choosing to outline the functional volumes as individual volumes, separated from one another.

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

The central table in structural glass (design Romolo Stanco for NIccolai), surrounded by Panton chairs (Vernor Panton for Vitra) filters the living room open space in a quiet, understated way, also provinding a counterpoint to the sofa.

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

The open space lets immediately see the asymmetric planimetry, oriented along two main lines. The first line, running parallel to the building’s interior yard, characterizes the two main sides of the house and the short side (overlooking the interior yard). The second line, inclined by 22°, closes the fourth side along the street, thus making the plant of the house a trapezoid with a 90° angle. The project was developed under the geometric influence of these two lines. The new functional volumes and the furniture are therefore arranged on two independent plans, which are rotated by 22° and oriented along the original main lines of the house. The space “folding” – to put it ironically with Peter Eisenman – does not merely entail the rotation of the plans, but rather brings about a new perspective, as intriguing as it is ambiguous.

Romolo Stanco apartment Hi-FI house

 

For more info visit: www.romolostanco.com